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Topic : Fish Farming for the Attainment of MDG 1  
  Fish Farming for the Attainment of MDG 1 Fish farming is one of the new initiatives that has been implemented in various regions in Tanzania. Fish farming is carried out through fish ponds and is mainly practiced by farmers in the rural communities as a source of food and income. Recently the respon ...Click here to read more
     
Comments From TAKNET Members
MEHMET BERBER  : Monday, May 12, 2014    
  Dear Sirs,

We would like to make our company and its products known to you briefly.

ASBIR GROUP- a group company founded by ERHAS IRRIGATION SYSTEMS, KOYLU AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and IKON VALVES- has been exporting the products it has produced in 3 factories located in Konya City and 1 factory in Şanlıurfa City, TURKEY and exporting to more than 25 countries in 4 continents through its branches, agencies and exclusive distributors for more than 50 years.

Our products are;

Sprinkler Irrigation Pipes and Accessories

Drip Irrigation Pipes and Accessories (Tape and Round Pipes)

Plastic Filters for Agricultural Irrigation

PP Compression Fittings

Clamp Saddles

PP Butterfly Valves for Agricultural Irrigation and Filtration

Agricultural Machines for Soil Preparation (Cultivators, Rotovators)

Seeding Machines

Harvesting Machines

Our websites are below which gives you general information about our products. If you are interested in our products, we will be happy to send you any further information.

We may be available in the near future to discuss the subject with you as well.

Thanking for your kind interest and we look forward for your early reply, we remain,

English Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vG1eyL1HRHM

Russian Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfxxBOEY8To

Arabic Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vaffxsjjixw

Websites:

www.asbir.com.tr

www.erhas.com

www.koylu.com

www.ikonmetal.com.tr

Yours respectfully,

Mehmet BERBER

FEVZİ ÇAKMAK MAH.BÜSAN ORGANİZE SANAYİ BÖLGESİ

10646 SOKAK NO : 5 P.K : 42250 KARATAY / KONYA

Tel : +90 (332) 236 01 22

Fax : +90 (332) 236 01 18

Mobile : +90 (554) 725 24 35

E-Mail : info@asbir.com.tr / www.asbir.com.tr

 
     

MEHMET BERBER  : Monday, May 12, 2014    
  Dear Sirs,

We would like to make our company and its products known to you briefly.

ASBIR GROUP- a group company founded by ERHAS IRRIGATION SYSTEMS, KOYLU AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and IKON VALVES- has been exporting the products it has produced in 3 factories located in Konya City and 1 factory in Şanlıurfa City, TURKEY and exporting to more than 25 countries in 4 continents through its branches, agencies and exclusive distributors for more than 50 years.

Our products are;

 Sprinkler Irrigation Pipes and Accessories

 Drip Irrigation Pipes and Accessories (Tape and Round Pipes)

 Plastic Filters for Agricultural Irrigation

 PP Compression Fittings

 Clamp Saddles

 PP Butterfly Valves for Agricultural Irrigation and Filtration

 Agricultural Machines for Soil Preparation (Cultivators, Rotovators)

 Seeding Machines

 Harvesting Machines

Our websites are below which gives you general information about our products. If you are interested in our products, we will be happy to send you any further information.

We may be available in the near future to discuss the subject with you as well.

Thanking for your kind interest and we look forward for your early reply, we remain,

English Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vG1eyL1HRHM

Russian Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfxxBOEY8To

Arabic Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vaffxsjjixw

Websites:

www.asbir.com.tr

www.erhas.com

www.koylu.com

www.ikonmetal.com.tr

Yours respectfully,

Mehmet BERBER

FEVZİ ÇAKMAK MAH.BÜSAN ORGANİZE SANAYİ BÖLGESİ

10646 SOKAK NO : 5 P.K : 42250 KARATAY / KONYA

Tel : +90 (332) 236 01 22

Fax : +90 (332) 236 01 18

Mobile : +90 (554) 725 24 35

E-Mail : info@asbir.com.tr / www.asbir.com.tr

 
     

senorina kimario  : Wednesday, March 12, 2014    
 

HI TAKNET MEMBER

I LIKE TO BE UPDATED ABOUT THE DISCUSSION

KINDLY

SENORINA..

 
     

Monica Stender  : Friday, November 08, 2013    
  I agree with Mr. Mwakalinga but, what I think after travelling a little around Tanzania is that there’s a lot to do to create opportunities to inhabitants and give them the capacity to develop their neighborhood in a first position. My point of view is that the best way to do this, is promote associations of micro producers what will give them more resources to attend the market in a competitive way and will permit to be the supplier of SME industries. The problem of which sector must be promoted first by the Government Institutions has a very difficult solution because each region has different resources that might be supported. It will depend of which sector can give faster return to reinvest in others.

Mónica E. Stender, Ph D, MBA

STENDER ASESORES, S.L.U.

Av. Madrid, 102 Entº 3ª

08028 - Barcelona - España

Tel: (34) 610 792450 Fax: (34) 93 229 6934

mstender@stender.biz www.stender.biz

Skype: monicastender

Linkedin: stender@stender.biz

 
     

elphone  : Friday, November 08, 2013    
  fishing farms has been existed for quite long time, basically environmentally Tanzania has so many place conducive to good fisheries production let alone farms for breeding and rearing various types of rather better species of fish.

we real need to promote fish farming by promoting better community participations from the start of projects, if we think to promote community economic growth.

Researched findings if well adopted will automatically elevate yields from fish farms, create good understanding on ways of better farming practices.

Better markets,transportation from farms to other sites, loans from recognizable institutions to help communities start farming likely will promote people direction towards fish farming at large.

Government need to raise trained personnel to run such area which is one of the big area of of economical growth ensure better fisheries schools or training institutions with all basic needs, is all that is needed for advanced technologies if required and technical personnel have to work with people at needs of service.

 
     

Hebron Mwakalinga  : Friday, November 08, 2013    
  Danford thanks for broadening the discussion outside the "fish pond" to national institutional capacity to deliver, you rightly observed that we weak, underfunded and sometime mismanaged government institutions and they are largely to blame for poor growth of agriculture sector that is lagging behind the overall economy. My feeling of what is going wrong is that we first are too much focused pico- and micro-, subsistence-based interventions that are fragmented and geographically dispersed. Is there such a success model in world? Even if you have institutions it is financially cost-ineffective to impart technology and other support to people who are fragmented. I have never been to Asia but I hear they have block farming arrangement within the smallholder landholding settings. Why block farming? Because of economies of scale (including access to extension and credit services) hence market competitiveness .(bold and underline market competitiveness).

In the past the Government had pronounced (but never issued a written guideline) that each district should identify two strategic commodities, one for cash and another for food security though recently the line between the two is becoming blurred. I have visited several districts and noted that there is no such a thing mainly due to politics that areas without the strategic crops are going to be left out something that will cost politicians during elections. So lack of focus. On the other hand there is an emerging class of private investors in agriculture so the question in the first place should be how do we support private investment in agriculture around which smallholder farmers should peg their advancement? This is a long unending debate.

Lets juxtapose there and return to fish farming. Policy wise investment by the Government to support fish farming will be a second priority as it is addressing nutrition and not necessarily food security. How much money will you spend on fish farming while the country is deficient in cereals? (We still import some 700000+Mt per annum). Would you take money from fertiliser subsidy say to promote fish farming? Even if we will get to the 10% of annual budget going to "agriculture" I doubt if fish farming will be a priority. However, turn 180degree away from Government investment and announce (as a Government) that the business of fish farming is highly profitable. See how money from different sources, domestic and foreign, legal and illegal, clean and dirty will flow in the sector.

My view has been that the role of the Government should not be to start with supporting production as it traditionally does. It should use the value chain model. Start from the market, the Government should invest in serious market assessments. the case in point - About 4 years back I called the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries asking about information on investment in fish farming. The officer asked me a very logical question - have you done a market assessment? I went dumb! She curtly said please do that before you come to us asking about investment costs. Very logical question and it is where our agriculture fails us. KILIMO KWANZA but it Pillar One should have been Market, Markets and Markets.

I posed the question in my last posting as to whether smallholder fish farmers will do the market analysis considering the influx of fish from Far East? It should be the Government that does this then disseminate information. Once positive information is available private capital will find its natural course including possibility for out grower arrangement. I will strongly discourage to put money into pico-, micro-, miniature- projects and projects that address production only at this point in time. Understand that we are closing in the 50million people mark, roads to district/regional headquarters are opening up to ease access to markets.

Having market-driven but all encompassing industry strategy necessitated by long-term market prospects should be the ultimate objective of the Government. In many instances when we refer to agriculture institutions we dwell on technology-based ones (the Agric. Research Institutions). We have TANTRADE what is exactly their contribution to the knowledge body about crop markets? I am compelled to say one office that needs to be strongly managed and supported in in the country is TANTRADE rather than ARIs for now.

Hebron Mwakalinga

Facilitating Markets for Development

 
     

Danford Sango  : Friday, November 01, 2013    
  Dear Hassan/Monica,

I agree with you that it is important to identify the roles of different institutions in supporting fish farming. Just to add a point, I also think that it equally and perhaps even more important to discuss the way we can make institutions responsible for supporting fish farming to be more effective. One clear problem we have related to development of agriculture and other sectors relates to inefficiency of institutions in delivering their mandates.

Specifically in agricultural sector where fish farming belong, a major scapegoat has always been little levels of funding. Over the past ten years, the government budget allocation to agricultural sector has increased from around 2% to the current 7% - the target is to reach 10%. While I totally agree with rationale for more budget allocation to agriculture sector to reach the 10% target, an intriguing question is "what has been the impact of the increase from 2% to 7% over the past ten years? One thing that we know is that growth of the sector has continued to stagnate at around 3%. We have also heard voice of peasants that they don't feel the impact of budget increase.

These observations says that the problem surrounding our institutions is not just budget limitation. There must be other challenges as well such as those related to governance and accountability, financial management, wrong priority setting, other capacity challenges (e.g. human resources) etc. This is one reason which makes BIG RESULTS NOW a very interesting initiative for everybody. We are all following up to see if BRN model - with its roots from Malaysia will be the solution for our under performing institutions. Is BRN the Mwarobaini?

I submit

 
     

Monica Stender  : Wednesday, October 30, 2013    
  Dear Sirs,

I think that each institute have different roles. Fishing school must ensure that its knowledge of the matter is up to date and adapted to local reality. Government must regulate the activity and determine the places where fishing farming could be installed with environment protection and create mechanism to promote the activity in the rural area improving financing, business and commerce. The fish farming is the beginning of the supply chain and, to be a success, all its link must be lubricate.

Best REgards

Mónica E. Stender, Ph D, MBA

STENDER ASESORES, S.L.U.

Av. Madrid, 102 Entº 3ª

08028 - Barcelona - España

Tel: (34) 610 792450 Fax: (34) 93 229 6934

mstender@stender.biz www.stender.biz

Skype: monicastender

Linkedin: stender@stender.biz

 
     

Abdallah Hassan  : Tuesday, October 29, 2013    
  Dear TAKNET members. Thank you for your contributions so far. Can we know discuss on what should be the role of relevant institutions, such as Fisheries Training Schools, Ministries (Govt), LGAs etc in improving fish farming in Tanzania for better livelihoods of the rural population?  
     

Apronius Vitalis Mbilinyi  : Thursday, October 17, 2013    
  Dear team members. I'm observing a long silence here!. Let me chokoza again by asking any body with interesting examples for simiral projects that had impact in income generation and poverty reduction. Such projects may include ufugaji wa Kuku.Mbuzi, bata etc. Other similar projects may include Kilimo cha Uyoga, Mbogamboga, Matunda etc. Such projects may have several outcomes. what is important in these projects is the objective and the final outcome and the lessons learned.Hence, I Once again call upon all forum members to air your project stories which in most cases are rarely shared(untold stories) for other people to learn. Let's get back to discussion.  
     

Apronius Vitalis Mbilinyi  : Wednesday, October 09, 2013    
 

Thanks Hassan for introducing this interesting poverty Alleviation Avenue which I think such projects need to be scaled up and lesson learned shared in other areas. From the discussion and examples of similar projects given the quick lesson I get is that fish farming is among the best avenue for increasing food and nutrition security and incomes to rural communities but training and environmental considerations need to be part of the package for such project to effectively produce the desired outcomes. Hence there is a need to start Shamba Darasa (Farmer Field schools) for training fish famers before project establishment.

Such shamba Darasa will give farmers practical skills on how fish farming is conducted in such localities and how local challenges can be handled. Another lesson is that other cross cutting issues such as environmental issues needs to be carefully though ahead of the project establishment. This is because scientist has predicted that the world will in future experience shortages for water and the developing countries will be hit harder; and If there is a war to come then scramble for water due water shortages attributed to climatic changes and water over use may be some of the a major contributors. Hence Water use planning is key for such projects to prosper. The examples given by Danford Sango, Neemak Kasunga and others provide lessons that projects need proper plans or feasibility studies as we see such project in unplanned/illegal water use areas leads to water abstraction in villages; whereas fish farmers went up constructing fish ponds in water source areas, hence a need to have proper training to fish farmers on the environmental effects of their projects.

Much as the projects provide positive benefits in terms of food, nutrition and income to farmers they also have negative effects that may have not been anticipated at the project establishment stage. But the other key issue is how such interesting lessons have been shared to other communities elsewhere so that when such similar projects are established spillover effects such as on environment are minimized or avoided. Hence my question to forum members is that what other lessons have we learned from such projects?

 

 
     

Camillus D. N. Kassala  : Tuesday, October 08, 2013    
  Sango's experience on the negative side brings up this lesson: management of our development cannot be dependent on development programmes, which have a comparatively short life cycle. Unfortunately we did away with our IDM-Mzumbe which trained development managers. There is a lot of management development these days, but very little development management. As a result we fail to manage even the little development we have achieved!

CDNKassala

 
     

ANTHONY GIKURI  : Tuesday, October 08, 2013    
  Many thanks Mr. Sallu for your determination to be a living example. We can learn from other countries as pointed out by some contributors in this discussion. The government on its side could encourage establishment of fish farms in some of its institutions particularly national service units, schools and colleges as a starting point.

Furthermore, while an individual person can venture into this prosperous industry, group initiatives should be encouraged. Group farming (youth, women, women, disabled) can mobilize their efforts and work towards achieving their predetermined objectives. Communities living adjacent to water resources such as rivers and lakes can easily establish and operate fish farms with minimal costs. As one of contributors pointed out, the demand for fish is unlimited. This could be a pool for absorbing youth hanging around in streets seeking for collar jobs.

Anthony Gikuri

Kizumbi Campus

Moshi University College of Cooperative and Business Studies

P.O.BOX 469

SHINYANGA

Tanzania

Mobile +255713634382/+25589448244/+255768805441

Website: www.muccobs.ac.tz

 
     

John Seka  : Tuesday, October 08, 2013    
  Dear Team,

First of all instead of using layman terminologies lets use the formal term for fish farming which is called "aquaculture" (thanks to Wikipedia).

Secondly, i do agree that this is one form of poverty alleviation strategy in an area where there is sufficient and naturally occurring or freely available water resources (assuming off course that this resource has no other useful or competing use or demand).

Thirdly we have ample resource people who can train our people. I happen to have visited a government maintained Aquaculture Project at Kingolwira Morogoro and i couldn't imagine how underutilised that center was.

But fourthly where is the money to the training, awareness raising and seed capital?

Just mooting these questions for protagonists to ponder.

John

 
     

JANUARY RAPHAEL BIKUBA  : Monday, October 07, 2013    
  I agree with you Mr Salu that fish farming can be a promissing economic undertaking especially for the rural people.However I am of the view that the undertaking will be effective only when the farming is undertaken on commercial basis.

So the question is , is fish farming as currently practiced likely to lead to a significant improvement of income among the rural households in the long term?. My opinion is that it is not likely. There lacks meaningful investment in the sector. People are not well empowered to undertake the farming commercially. Elsewhere where it has been successful eg. Israel a lot of investment has been committed to the sector. Unless more resources are not put in the sub sector and the farmers empowered, it is likely to end up like other many agricultural initiatives which performed well during the donor project funding periods and deteriorated after donor funding ceases.

January R. Bikuba, GEITA DISTRICT COUNCIL. Cell: +255-(0)765-300785/(0)786681645. Email :January_bikuba@yahoo.com

 
     

Hebron Mwakalinga  : Monday, October 07, 2013    
  Colleagues, the discussion on fish farming should be viewed as an industry and not just an activity for supplementary income/food to households. Let us open up our thinking on the premise that the equation about fish supply and demand is not a balanced one yet. On the demand side Tanzania imports a significant amount of fish from Far East. I don't have data at hand but my rule of the thumb is that whenever you find large quantities of fish of single type and same size chances are that they are farmed. Check the fish we eat in hotels, at colleagues and lately vendors moving around with fresh fish in baskets! Imported farmed fish are cheaper in price. On the supply side Tanzania exports fish (the Nile Perch) though stocks have fallen dramatically following overfishing - so went employment and forex used to be sustained by exports. What we have done to retain our market share? Lake Victoria fish conservation? I happened to have worked with Lake Victoria Environment Management Programme many years back and it had a component to train/support fish farming - not sure how far that went. there were similar initiatives in Uganda under USAID support to find alternative source of fish.

As a country we have a big potential to revolutionalise this latent but potential industry. What is needed and many countries where economic development takes supremacy over politics, the Government assumes responsibilities to map the sector from International, Regional and National perspective and give the information to potential investors. The information include markets, standards, trade arrangements, pre-feasibility analyses, and does the marketing of the business concepts. It is not possible for a farmer in Uluguru Mountains to do this.

Technologically, fish rearing can be done at various scale from miniature households backyard fish tanks, ponds, community ponds, river/lake/sea shore captive rearing, etc. If we want to have impact, we need to target all scales but more important the large scale i.e. tens or hundreds of acres of fish farms. It is possible. While miniature/micro activities are appealing from subsistence angle, large scale is ultimate end, looking at competitiveness in global and regional settings. Karibu!

Hebron Mwakalinga

Facilitating Markets for Development

Urafiki Flats. Block EC. 2nd Floor. Morogoro Road..

P.O.Box 78496. Dar es Salaam.

Tel. + 255 786 171 000 or +255 752 171 000

 
     

Jackie Karanja  : Monday, October 07, 2013    
  I may not be an expert on the topic at hand, but would like to share my thoughts on this topic.

The idea of fish farming is a fantastic concept for achieving MDG's. However, my position on this is, to encourage and implement fish farming today that will destroy the environment for tomorrow is retrogressive. We must find a sustainable solution for the next 100 yrs.

I will use and example, in Kenya fish farming was encouraged in the central highlands, especially in the regions where there were permanent rivers passing by. The Central highlands are mainly red loam volcanic soil, which means for you to farm fish, you would need to dig out the pond, line it up with plastic material so that the water does not sip away and do your farming. Due to the support extended by the government then, a lot of farmers were encouraged to grow fish. This was an excellent idea.

However, since the central highland are not the natural ecosystem for growing fish (preferable areas would have black/grey clay soil) the central highlands produced more than 40% of the food basket for the country, suddenly there was as shortage of food supplies (maize, beans, vegetables, coffee, tea, etc). secondly if a farmer felt that the fish farming was not as profitable as regular farming, it was difficult to reclaim the land and use it for farming (fish pond was dug out)

Now if the project had been encouraged in natural ecosystems (black clay soil that can hold water for fish farming, but cumbersome for agricultural farming) this would have been a win-win situation for all. The fish farming project would a perfect solution to this. The logistics would be, to get sufficient water supplies to these natural ecosystems and then let them thrive.

In rural areas, fish farming works - but the policy that encourages this should not only look at the possible financial gain with support but also consider the environmental impact in the areas projected to fish farming.

My final comment, I think in areas where fish farming is to be encouraged, tree farming or forestry should also be encouraged. this will provide a balance for the ecosystem in both the short and long-term.

 
     

Amon Manyama  : Monday, October 07, 2013    
  Let me contribute through this link. It is very relevant for Tanzania.

The link to a publication that provide fish production chain from construction of fish cages to stocking, feeding, harvesting, marketing and profitability issues. http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/WF_2500.pdf

 
     

SALLU JOHNSON  : Monday, October 07, 2013    
  Hi Francis,

I have seen this happening with my In-Law at his Bunju resince. a 5 x 6 sq.m pond with a depth of about a Meter and half. There was no river diversion as the pond is cemented and a bozer filled it with fresh water. Fish siblings have just been planted and I am told it would take 3 Months before the 1st harvest could take place.

I am interested to do the same, as you know, the market for food especially in urban centres is never limited. You can play with pricing mechanisim to beat the market, as you are aware a Kilo of Fish sells at around Tshs. 8,000/= where any thing below that could enable you a strong penetration to the market, apart from being able to provide for your family nutricious need.

I will get back with details.

Sallu E. Johnson CMILT(UK)

Dar es Salaam - Tanzania.

Cell: +255 (0) 784 368 888 / 0715 062 888

Email: sallujohnson@yahoo.com

 
     

Monica Stender  : Friday, October 04, 2013    
  Dear Sirs,

I’ve a problem to access the page and discussions. When I inform my password the page sais:

Login Failed. Enter valid information OR you are YET to Be APPROVED - Did you ever Received Approval email Notification ?

Please, could you see what is happening?

Thank you very much

 
     

Francis Kinyawela  : Friday, October 04, 2013    
  Hi Sallu,

can you please give more information on how to start, requirements, problems and marketing ideas in this project.

Regards,

francis

 
     

Danford Sango  : Thursday, October 03, 2013    
 

I happened to undertake a special project (for undergraduate degree study) on fish farming in Uluguru Mountains in 2000. I did the Special Project within FAO supported project titled Aquaculture for Local Communities Development Programme (ALCOM). I can recall two things:-

i. On the positive side I was inspired by substantial spillover i.e. adoption of extension technologies by farmers in other villages which were not the primary target. These were not trained or given any support but they copied the technology from other beneficiary villages and started fish farming in their areas.

ii. On the other hand, I do recall a lot of diversion of river waters which I was not happy with for concerns related with destruction of the environment.

Unfortunately I never had an opportunity to go back later to Mgeta, Matombo etc to see how the project continued especially after phasing out of FAO support.

Sango

 
     

Joseph Kundy Majengo  : Thursday, October 03, 2013    
  It is an interesting investment,that can be designed locally and i think some thing workable at in various scale. For those who have experiences ,can you share about the risks for such project and how market can be a barrier to farmers.  
     

Neemak Eddy Kasunga  : Thursday, October 03, 2013    
  A project that was funded by the Belgian Technical Cooperation in Kagera Region -2010 "Improvement of Food Security and Livelihoods in Kagera Region" focused on assisting participatory farmers groups to plan and implement Quick-Win-Projects that will increase in food availability, enhance food accessibility and promote food utilization. Among the QWPs were fish farming. Groups were supported t access micro credits, extension services among other services. Fish farming to those FGs added not only nutritions, rather added income fo members of the group increasing the purchasing power in the family.

But this is not only relevant to rural areas, in urbans we witness idle ponds which could be utilized fully in fish farming and ducks keeping.

neemak e.k (0784 305 005)

 
     

SALLU JOHNSON  : Wednesday, October 02, 2013    
 

This is a promising economic undertaking not only for the rural people but mostly of the peripheral dwellers of most of our national urban centres where there is a lot of underemployment.

a 4 x 5 sq meter could generate a sustainable income sufficient to run a household on all its expenditures i.e. schooling, medical, living expenses and in the extreme provide surplus money to cater for the least of nutritious food.

I have much hope for this type of economic undertakings at household level that can gear the nation towards realizing the Millennium (DG) objectives.

Sallu E. Johnson CMILT(UK)

Dar es Salaam - Tanzania.

Cell: +255 (0) 784 368 888 / 0715 062 888

Email: sallujohnson@yahoo.com

 
     

Abdallah Hassan  : Wednesday, October 02, 2013    
  Fish farming is one of the new initiatives that has been implemented in various regions in Tanzania. Fish farming is mainly practiced by farmers in the rural communities as a source of food and income. Recently the response has been positive and extremely high as evidenced by a large number of individual farmers and farmers’ groups specialized in fish farming.

Findings from the interviews with farmers (through their groups) in Lake Zone show that this is the promising economic venture and therefore strategic interventions geared towards promoting fish farming are inevitable if the rural livelihoods are to be improved. The demand and willingness to participate in fish farming is apparently high showing how people are hopeful that such interventions will change their lives.

However, implementation of fish farming projects in the communities of Lake Zone for example has led to threats and stress of the ecosystems. Most of the participating farmers and especially the new ones do not observe environmental rules and values. For example some fish ponds are constructed close to the water sources and in the wetlands thus disrupting the hydrological regime in these areas and therefore threatening sustainability of such environmental resources. most of the existing fish ponds are poorly constructed. .

Given the potential of fish farming in attaining the MDG 1 (eradication of extreme poverty), and the zeal from rural people to participate into this economic venture, one could say that this is another avenue which needs to be explored further.

This brief is intended to solicit for your views on the way we can make this sub-sector more beneficial to the rural people and Tanzanians in general. Please give your opinion on the following thematic areas:

1. Do you think fish farming can help improve the life of farmers in the rural areas? How?

2. What can we learn from the experience of other countries such as those of Asia on fish farming? (In terms of technology, jobs creation, etc)

3. What is your opinion regarding the impact of fish farming on the ecosystem?

4. What should the relevant institutions, such as Fisheries Training Schools, Ministries, LGAs etc do to revolutionalize fish farming in Tanzania for better livelihoods of the rural population?

This discussion is moderated by: Dr. O. Mshindano, Mrs. M. Nzuki, Mr. A. Mbilinyi and Mr. A. Hassan

 
     

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